Tag Archives: Clive Coates

Keeping up with the Joneses in Burgundy — Morey Edition

Photo by PRA. Uploaded to Wikimedia Commons under  CC-BY-SA-3.0As with our first edition featuring the Boillot family, we’re going to explore the many Morey estates in Meursault and Chassagne-Montrachet, trying to dissect the tangled weave of similar names to see how the estates may (or may not) be related.

Along with some Google-Foo, my scalpels on this journey will be:

Remington Norman and Charles Taylor’s The Great Domaines of Burgundy
Clive Coates’ The Wines of Burgundy
Matt Kramer’s Making Sense of Burgundy
Bill Nanson’s The Finest Wines of Burgundy

The Morey Family

The Morey family’s history in Burgundy dates back to at least the 16th century with evidence of winemaking in Meursault since 1793. The history in Chassagne-Montrachet dates back to Claude Morey’s arrival from the village of Paris l’Hôpital in 1643.

In modern winemaking history, Albert Morey (father of Jean-Marc and Bernard) was one of the first estates in Chassagne-Montrachet to domaine bottle when he started out in 1950.

Robert Parker has noted in Burgundy: A Comprehensive Guide to the Producers, Appellations, and Wines, that the Morey family name is well regarded in Burgundy for producing “…very good, sometimes excellent white wines.”

In studying the various Morey domaines, the family’s prominence in the Grand Cru vineyard of Bâtard-Montrachet is apparent with several members producing examples. Though Domaine Pierre Morey owns nearly half a hectare and Domaine Pierre-Yves Colin-Morey contracts with multiple growers in the Grand Cru to expand his production, most of the Morey Bâtards come from tiny holdings averaging only around 0.11 hectare (≈ 0.27 acres).

The Current Morey Estates

Domaine Pierre Morey (Meursault) founded in 1971 by Pierre Morey, son of Auguste Morey, who farmed several parcels for Domaine Comte Lafon under métayage agreement. For two decades, Pierre also served as vineyard and winery manager for Domaine Leflaive during which time he was inspired to convert his estate to organic viticulture in 1992 and biodynamic in 1997.
Prime holdings: Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru (0.48 ha), Meursault 1er Les Perrières (0.52 ha) and Pommard 1er Les Grand Epenots (0.43 ha)

Domaine Emile Jobard-Morey (Meursault) tiny 4.5 ha domaine ran by Rémy Ehret, son-in-law of the original owners, and Valentin Jobard. The vineyards are farmed using sustainable viticulture. Unfortunately not much information is available about this estate to decipher the connection to the other Moreys or to estates like Domaine Antoine Jobard.
Prime holdings: Meursault 1er Charmes (parcel just below Les Perrières) and Meursault 1er Le Porusot

Domaine Jean-Marc Morey (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 1981 by Jean-Marc after the retirement of his father, Albert Morey, with his father’s holdings divided between Jean-Marc and his brother Bernard (Thomas & Vincent’s father). For almost two decades his daughter, Caroline, has helped him manage the property with his son, Sylvain, running Bastide du Claux in the Luberon.
Prime holdings: St. Aubin 1er Les Charmois (0.40 ha), Beaune 1er Grèves rouge & blanc (0.65 ha) and Chassagne-Montrachet Les Champs Gains rouge & blanc (0.77 ha)

Domaine Marc Morey et Fils (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 1919 by Marc’s father Fernand Morey with Marc taking over the family estate in 1944. In 1978, the estate was divided between his two children with his son, Michael, taking his holdings to establish Domaine Morey-Coffinet while his daughter, Marie-Joseph, and her husband Bernard Mollard continued producing under the Domaine Marc Morey name. Today the estate is ran by their daughter Sabine with all the vineyards being farmed sustainably.
Prime holdings: Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru (0.14 ha), Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Caillerets (0.20) and quasi-monopole of Chassagne-Montrachet 1er En Virondot (2.02 ha) with the domaine buying the remaining 0.1 ha from other growers

Domaine Pierre-Yves Colin-Morey (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 2001 as a négociant firm by Pierre-Yves Colin (son of Marc Colin in St. Aubin) and Caroline Morey, daughter of Jean-Marc Morey, with the first solo vintage of estate fruit being produced in 2006. Prior to returning to his father’s estate in 1995, Pierre-Yves spent time working in California at estates like Chalk Hill and in the Loire and Rhone. The vineyards of Domaine Pierre-Yves Colin-Morey are farmed sustainably with some hectares farmed completely organic.
Prime holdings: Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Chenevottes (0.40 ha) with purchase contracts for Grand Crus Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet, Corton-Charlemagne and Bâtard-Montrachet

Caroline Morey’s Chassagne-Montrachet Le Chêne


Domaine Caroline Morey founded in 2014 by Caroline Morey, daughter of Jean-Marc Morey and wife of Pierre-Yves Colin. The domaine owns 7 ha inherited from Caroline’s father in Chassagne-Montrachet and Santenay.
Prime holdings: Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Caillerets (0.75 ha) and Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Champ Gains

Domaine Thomas Morey (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 2006 when the estate of Bernard Morey (Jean-Marc’s brother) was divided between his sons, Thomas and Vincent. The estate is relatively unique among the Moreys with around half of its production being focused on red Pinot noir. All the vineyards are farmed sustainably.
Prime holdings: Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru (0.10 ha), Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Vide-Bourse (0.20 ha located just below Bâtard-Montrachet) and Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Dent de Chien (0.07 ha located just about Le Montrachet)

Domaine Vincent et Sophie Morey (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 2006 when Vincent inherited his share of his father’s estate. His wife Sophie is from the notable Belland family in Santenay and brought with her to the domaine around 12 ha. All the vineyards are sustainably farmed.
Prime holdings: Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru (0.10 ha), Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Embrazées (3.80 ha) and Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Caillerets (0.35 ha)

Domaine Morey-Coffinet (Chassagne-Montrachet) founded in 1978 when Michael Morey, son of Marc, combined his inheritance with that of his wife, Fabienne (daughter of Fernand Coffinet and Cécile Pillot). The other part of Domaine Coffinet went to Fabienne’s sister, Laure, who founded Domaine Coffinet-Duvernay. The estate has been practicing organic cultivation (receiving Ecocert in 2015) and is converting over to biodynamic.
Prime holdings: Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru (0.13 ha), Chassagne-Montrachet 1er En Remilly (0.35 ha located next to Chevalier-Montrachet) and Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Les Blanchots-Dessus (0.06 ha the southern extension of Le Montrachet)

Getting Geeky with 2008 Sarget de Gruaud-Larose

Going to need more than 60 Seconds to geek out about the 2008 Sarget de Gruaud-Larose from St. Julien.

The Backstory

Clive Coates notes in Grand Vins that the 2nd Growth estate Ch. Gruaud-Larose was formed in 1757 when two brothers, one a priest and the other a judge, pooled together their inheritance and purchased adjoining vineyards to create the 116 hectare (≈ 287 acres) property. Wine that was in high regard and commanded prices almost on par with estates like Ch. Latour and Margaux had been produced on the property for sometime prior to the brothers’ involvement.

The Gruaud brothers were known for their eccentricities, particularly the judge, who would hoist different flags on the property after harvest to signal what nationality he felt that year’s wines would most appeal to. A British flag would be raised if the wines were going to be full-bodied and firm, a German flag if they were going to be soft and supple and a Dutch flag for a style that was a mix of the two.

The magistrate also garnered a reputation for alienating the merchants and négociants with his business practices. Each year when the previous vintage was ready to be sold, he would go to the market center and set his price for the vintage. If his price wasn’t met, he would leave only to come a few months later with an even higher asking price for his unsold wine. In what seems like a foreshadowing of the future tranche release and en primeur systems, M. Gruaud would keep raising his price until eventually the merchants capitulated else wise the price would be higher the next time he returned.

In 1778, the property passed to the magistrate’s daughter and son-in-law, Joseph-Sébastian de La Rose, who affixed the name Larose to the estate. Larose would also go on to establish the large Haut-Medoc estate of Ch. Larose-Trintaudon located on the border of Saint-Laurent and Pauillac.

The author at Gruaud-Larose.


The estate would change hands multiple times and in 1867 the two families who jointly owned the property split it up into two estates–Ch. Gruaud Larose Sarget and Ch. Gruaud Larose Faure (sometimes labelled as Ch. Gruaud Larose-Bethmann). The two estates co-existed until the early 20th century when the Bordeaux négociant family of Cordier bought first the Sarget portion in 1917 and then the Faure portion in 1935 to reunite the two properties.

Founded in 1877, the Cordier négociant house became a significant player during World War I when they landed the exclusive contract to supply the daily wine rations for the entire French Army. Flushed with income, they were able to acquire numerous estates over the next several decades beyond Gruaud-Larose, including the St. Emilion estate Clos des Jacobins, the Premier Grand Cru Classé Sauternes estate Ch. Laufarie-Peyraguey, Ch. Meyney in St. Estèphe, the 5th Growth Haut-Medoc estate of Ch. Cantemerle and the 4th Growth St. Julien estate of Ch. Talbot.

Today, Gruaud-Larose is owned by the Merlaut family under their Taillan Group which also includes the 5th Growth Pauillac estate of Haut-Bages Libéral, the 3rd Growth Margaux estate of Ch. Ferrière, Ch. Chasse-Spleen, Ch. Citran and several others in Bordeaux, the Loire and the Rhone.

The Estate

Bottles from the 1815 vintage of Gruaud-Larose in the estate’s cellar.

While still a large estate by Bordeaux standards with over 200 acres planted to vines, Ch. Gruaud-Larose has seen it size reduced somewhat since the 18th century. However, it is still one of the few estates whose vineyards have remained relatively the same since the property was classified in 1855.

The majority of the vineyards are on the southern side of St. Julien between Ch. Lagrange and Ch. Brainaire-Ducru. There is a parcel further west next to Ch. Talbot and another plot of vines located on the boundary of St. Julien and the commune of Cussac, across the road from the Haut-Medoc estate of Ch. Lanessan. While the average age of the vines are 40 years old, the estate owns several plots that are more than 100 years of age. All the vineyards are sustainably and organically farmed with around 100 acres farmed biodynamically.

Jeff Leve of The Wine Cellar Insider notes that Gruaud-Larose is unique in St. Julien for not only having the most clay soils in the commune but also for being located at the highest elevation on the St. Julien plateau.

After the retirement of winemaker Georges Pauli, Eric Boissenot has served as consultant for the estate.

Wine Stats

Ch. Gruaud-Larose produces around 540,000 bottles a year with about 45% of the yearly production being declassified to the second wine of Sarget de Gruaud-Larose. Named after the mid-19th century owner, Baron Jean Auguste Sarget, the wine spent 18 months aging in 30% new oak.

In 2008, the blend was 57% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc, 3% Petit Verdot and 2% Malbec with around 15,100 cases made.

The Wine

Photo by © Superbass. Released on Wikimedia Commons under CC-by-SA-4.0

A lot of cedar cigar box notes in this wine.

Medium-plus intensity nose. Very cigar box with tobacco spice and cedar. Underneath there is some red fruits like currant and plum.

On the palate, those cigar notes carry through and bring an even more savory, meaty element. Medium-plus acidity maintains freshness and adds a little juicy element to the red fruits. Medium tannins still have some grip but are rather mellow at this point. Moderate length finish ends with the same cigar box notes that have dominated this wine from the beginning.

The Verdict

With the 2008 edition of the Grand Vin of Gruard-Larose going for around $90, the 2008 Sarget de Gruaud-Larose is a very solid second wine at around $35-40.

It is a classic St. Julien that would certainly appeal to folks who like old school, savory Bordeaux. While the tannins are softening, the wine has enough acidity and structure to still be drinking well for at least another 3 years.

60 Second Wine Review — 2007 Poisot Romanée-Saint-Vivant

A few quick thoughts on the 2007 Domaine Poisot Romanée-Saint-Vivant Grand Cru.

The Geekery

Domaine Poisot began in 1902 when Marie Poisot inherited half of her father, Louis Latour’s, estate with her brother, Louis, taking the other half. For many years, the Poisots parcels were farmed in agreement with Maison Latour but starting in the 1980s, Maurice Poisot, grandson of Marie, began taking back the family plots.

In 2010, Maurice’s son Rémi, a captain in the French Navy, returned home after 28 years at sea to take over the estate. The tiny domaine owns around 5 acres that includes choice parcels in the Grand Crus of Romanée-Saint-Vivant (1.2 acres), Corton-Charlemagne (1.4 acres) and Corton-Bressandes (1.06 acres) as well as holdings in Pernand Vergelesses 1er Cru en Caradeux (0.89 acres).

According to Clive Coates in The Wines of Burgundy, the parcel of Romanée-Saint-Vivant that Poisot owns is in the southwest corner of the Grand Cru, just below Romanée-Conti, in the section known as Clos-des-Quatre-Journaux and was historically farmed by the Benedictine monks of Saint-Vivant de Vergy for over 650 years. They share this section of the Grand Cru with other notable domaines like Arnoux, Domaine de l’Arlot, Sylvain Cathiard and Dujac. The section that l’Arlot farms used to belong to Remi’s uncle, Henri Poisot, who sold it in 1990.

The Wine

Medium intensity nose. Some floral herbal notes–fennel and sage. Red fruits like cherries and currants dominant. Fairly youthful aromas for its age.

Photo by ShakataGaNai. Uploaded to Wikimedia Commons under  CC-BY-SA-3.0

Lots of red cherries in this Burg.


On the palate, those red fruits carry through and bring some subtle oak baking spice like cinnamon and cloves. The herbal notes also carry through and married with the medium-plus acidity, give a savory juiciness to the wine. Medium tannins and medium body do contribute to the silkiness characterized of Romanée-Saint-Vivant but the finish is very short.

The Verdict

An interesting wine that was fun to try but not quite worth the $245-260 to buy.

It’s clear that the domaine is going in a new direction with Rémi Poisot in charge so it is worth keeping an eye on.

60 Second Wine Review — Pascal Bouchard Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos

Some quick thoughts on the 2011 Pascal Bouchard Chablis Grand Cru Les Clos.

The Geekery

Clive Coates notes, in The Wines of Burgundy, that the domaine of Pascal Bouchard was founded in 1979 when Pascal and his wife Joëlle inherited vines that belonged to her father André Tremblay. Today the domaine is ran by their son, Romain, and covers a little over 81 acres–including vines in the Grand Cru climats of Les Clos, Vaudesir and Blanchot.

Pascal Bouchard also owns several choice plots of Premier Cru vineyards including Fourchaume and Mont de Milieu on the Grand Cru side of Chablis and Beauroy, Montmains and Vau de Vey to the west of the Serein river.

The vineyards are farmed sustainably with the avoidance of chemicals and pesticides. The Grand Crus are aged in oak (15% new) for at least 12 months on the lees though they do not see any bâtonnage to ensure freshness.

Les Clos is the largest of the Chablis Grand Crus with the vines facings south between Valmur and Blanchot. The wines are noted for their racy minerality and depth that often require bottle aging. Other notable estates that produce wine from this vineyard includes Francois Raveneau (Wine Searcher Ave $708), Rene et Vincent Dauvissat-Camus (Ave $247) and William Fevre (Ave $108).

The Wine

Photo from Wikimedia Commons uploaded by Mrjane and released under CC-BY-SA-2.0

Chablis’ Grand Crus

Medium-plus intensity nose. Lots of citrus aromas, both the pulp and pith. There are also some floral notes adding depth.

On the palate, those citrus notes carry through and you can feel the weight from the oak. There is distinct minerality, especially on the finish with some salinity wrapping itself around the citrus flavors. Mouthwatering and savory. Medium-plus acidity gives freshness.

The Verdict

Les Clos’ age-worthiness certainly stands out in this wine which was surprisingly fresh for 6+ years.

The noticeable weight of the oak and “pithy” tannins are a bit unique from stereotypical stainless steel Chablis but the terroir’s minerality still shines through and adds savory complexity. It’s a very characterful Chablis Grand Cru that is well worth $90-100 but it’s certainly not a benchmark example.

60 Second Wine Review — Capitain-Gagnerot Corton-Renardes

Some quick thoughts on the 2010 Maison Capitain-Gagnerot Corton-Renardes Grand Cru.

The Geekery

According to Clive Coates’ The Wines of Burgundy, the Capitains’ history in the region dates back to the 17th century. Domaine Gagnerot was established in 1802 with the Capitain family joining it in marriage in 1864.

Today it is managed by the current generation of Patrice and Michel Capitain who tend to almost 40 acres that includes not only around 0.8 acres in Corton-Renardes but also plantings in the Grand Crus of Corton-Charlemagne, Échezeaux, Clos Vougeot and the greater Corton Grand Cru. They also own the premier cru monopole of La Micaude in Ladoix-Serrigny.

Les Renardes is one of 25 climats on the hill of Corton and is considered one of the more highly regarded climats of the Grand Cru along with Clos du Roi, Les Bressandes, Les Perrières, Les Pougets and Les Grèves.

The Wine

Medium intensity nose. Some red fruits but mostly earthy forest floor and savory “chicken herbs”–rosemary, thyme, marjoram and sage. It’s not quite define which herbs but smelling this wine makes me think I’m by the rotisserie at Costco.

On the palate, the wine has medium plus acidity and firm medium tannins. The acidity amplifies the red fruit flavors and gives them more precision as cherries and pomegranate. The savoriness from the nose carries through but it is still not very defined.

The climat of Les Renardes on the Aloxe-Corton side of the Grand Cru Corton.
Photo courtesy of Atlas Vins from Jacques Michot – Sepia Art & Cartographie.

The Verdict

This is a hefty and very dense Grand Cru Pinot noir that is probably in its awkward adolescence. You can tell that there is a lot of layers of complexity waiting to unfurl but it is not there yet. The hints are there, especially with the intriguing savoriness.

At around $150 for a Grand Cru from a good quality vintage, I can see this eventually living up to its price and is worth squirreling away a couple bottles in the cellar for another 5 to 10 years.

60 Second Wine Review — Ch. de Mercey En Sazenay

Some quick thoughts on the 2012 Château de Mercey Mercurey 1er cru En Sazenay.

The Geekery

Château de Mercey is owned by the merchant house of Antonin Rodet that was founded in the Mercurey region of the Côte Chalonnaise in 1875. In addition to producing wines under their own label and Ch. de Mercey, they also own Château de Rully (based around the AOC of the same name) and Domaine de la Bressande (based in Mercurey).

In his book, The Wines of Burgundy, Master of Wine Clive Coates notes that under enologist Nadine Gublin Antonin Rodet has become a source for highly reliable wines in the Côte Chalonnaise. Though the current winemaker appears to be Anne-Laure Hernette.

The premier cru vineyard of Sazenay in Mercurey covers 118 acres in the heart of the commune. The lieu-dit that Ch. de Mercey owns is sustainably farmed and contains 50+ year old vines planted in sandy clay-limestone soils. Other estates that produce wine from this premier cru includes Château de Chamirey (Wine Searcher Ave $39), Jean-Michel & Laurent Pillot (Ave $35) and Domaine Hugues et Yves de Suremain (Ave $34).

The wine spent 12 months aging in 25% new oak.

The Wine

Medium intensity nose–a mix of red cherries with oak spice and smoke.

https://www.bourgogne-wines.com/our-wines-our-terroir/all-bourgogne-wines/mercurey,2459,9254.html?&args=Y29tcF9pZD0xNDUyJmFjdGlvbj12aWV3RmljaGUmaWQ9MzQ4Jnw%3D

The Sazenay 1er highlighted in the commune of Mercurey. Photo courtesy of www.bourgogne-wines.com

On the palate, the cherries come through with some raspberry fruit and taste very fresh with medium plus acidity. The smoke leaves but oak spice is still prevalent and gets more defined as cinnamon and clove with a little star anise. Medium body and medium tannins with a moderate finish that has some minerality.

The Verdict

The Mercurey region in the Côte Chalonnaise is often a go-to source for value in Burgundy and this bottle of Ch. de Mercey hold that to be true. At around $35 it offers a good amount of character and complexity that is difficult to find in under $50 red Burgundies.

This wine would particularly star on the table with poultry and smoked salmon.

60 Second Wine Review — 2009 Ch. Gloria

Some quick thoughts on the 2009 Chateau Gloria from Saint Julien.

The Geekery

According to Stephen Brook in The Complete Bordeaux, long-time St. Julien mayor Henri Martin began piecing together the estate that would become Ch. Gloria in 1939.

Clive Coates noted in Grands Vins, that Martin was able to add pieces of vineyards to Gloria that originally belonged to the Second Growths of Ch. Ducru-Beaucaillou, Ch. Gruaud-Larose, Ch. Léoville-Barton, Ch. Léoville-Poyferré, the 3rd Growth Ch. Lagrange and 4th Growth Ch. Beychevelle. He even acquired parcels of vineyards in St. Julien that was owned by Ch. Duhart-Milon.

Today the estate is around 124 acres and ran by Henri Martin’s son-in-law, Jean-Louis Triaud, who also manages the 4th Growth estate Chateau St. Pierre.

The 2009 is a blend of 61% Cabernet Sauvignon, 27% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc and 6% Petit Verdot. The yearly production of the estate is around 250,000 bottles with a second wine, Ch. Peymartin, also produced.

The Wine

Pop and pour, medium plus intensity nose with dark fruits like black plum and black current and a sweet floral note. After 45 minutes in the decanter, it becomes spicy with a combination of tobacco spice and oak spices like cinnamon and clove

By Pollinator - Own workAssumendTransferred from en.wikipedia, CC BY 2.5,on Wikimedia Commons

Right now the 2009 Gloria has more of a fresh tobacco leaf spiciness to it. With more age I can see it become more cured cigar tobacco spicy.

On the palate, those spice notes still dominant, adding loads of layers that you want to unfurl with your tongue, piece by piece. Medium plus tannins and medium plus acidity compliment the mix of dark and red fruits. Very long finish adds a Christmas fruitcake note.

The Verdict

This wine is still fairly young but it is in a beautiful spot right now. It could go easily another 10-15 years without blinking an eye.

At around $60-65, the 2009 Chateau Gloria is criminally under priced for how good it is. From a blockbuster vintage, this wine is going toe to toe with 3rd and 4th Growth wines are 20-55% higher in price. If you find this wine, grab it.

Keeping up with the Joneses in Burgundy — Boillot edition

Photo by Geoffrey Fairchild, released on Wikimedia Commons via Flickr under pd-author
An oft repeated truism in the world of Burgundy is that you should buy based on the producer rather than the vineyard or classification. But this solid piece of advice becomes difficult to follow when you run into multiple bottles made by producers with similar names.

In many cases, these estates are related by blood or marriage which creates a tangled web for a Burgundy lover to untangle.

As part of my own studies, I’m going to try to untangle some of these webs–one common surname at a time. I would greatly appreciate any suggestions for additions or corrections in the comments.

My tools on this journey, besides the internet, will be:

Remington Norman and Charles Taylor’s The Great Domaines of Burgundy
Clive Coates’ The Wines of Burgundy
Matt Kramer’s Making Sense of Burgundy
Bill Nanson’s The Finest Wines of Burgundy

We will start off with the Boillot family.

The Boillot family’s history of winemaking in Burgundy dates back to 1855 with the fifth generation of Boillots now running their eponymous estates. At several of these estates (like Domaine Jean-Marc Boillot and Domaine Henri Boillot) the sixth generation is working in the family business and preparing to take over.

In 1955, a conflict between Lucien Boillot and his father Henri lead to Lucien leaving his father’s estate, Domaine Henri Boillot, and starting his own winery. Henri’s other son, Jean, eventually took over Domaine Henri Boillot and renamed it Domaine Jean Boillot. Jean also married Colette Sauzet, daughter of the fame Puligny-Montrachet producer Etienne Sauzet.


Lucien had two sons, Louis and Pierre, with Louis starting his own estate in 2002 and Pierre inheriting control of Domaine Lucien Boillot et Fils.

Jean also had two sons, Jean-Marc and Henri, as well as a daughter, Jeanine, who married Gérard Boudot and now manages Domaine Sauzet. Jean-Marc started his own eponymous winery in 1989 while Henri started a négociant firm (Maison Henri Boillot) before eventually assuming what was left of Domaine Jean Boillot. To avoid confusion with his brother’s estate, he merged the holdings into his own domaine and changed the name back to Domaine Henri Boillot.

The Current Boillot Estates

Domaine Louis Boillot (Chambolle-Musigny) founded in 2002 when the estate of Lucien Boillot et Fils was split between Louis and his brother, Pierre. Louis is married to Ghislaine Barthod who runs her namesake estate in Chambolle-Musigny.
Prime holdings: Gevrey-Chambertain 1er Champonnet (0.19 ha) and Volnay 1er Les Caillerets (0.18 ha)

Domaine Lucien Boillot et Fils (Gevrey Chambertain) currently ran by Pierre.
Prime holdings: Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Perrières (0.23 ha) and Volnay 1er Cru Les Caillerets (0.18 ha)

Domaine Jean-Marc Boillot (Pommard) founded in 1989. Prior to starting his own estate, Jean-Marc worked as a winemaker for Olivier Leflaive.
Prime holdings: Puligny-Montrachet 1er Les Champ Ganet (0.13 ha) and Les Combettes (0.47 ha)

Domaine Henri Boillot (Volnay) founded as a négociant firm in 1984. In 2005, Henri bought out his siblings shares of his father’s estate (Domaine Jean Boillot) and merged the holdings into his own domaine.
Prime holdings: Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru (0.34 ha), Volnay 1er Les Fermiets (2.4 ha) and monopole of Puligny-Montrachet 1er Clos de la Mouchère (3.99 ha) within Les Perrières